Gender equality in Norway:
Research, statistics and policies

Latest news

The paternity leave is still popular

05.12.2019

Statistics Norway use 12 indicators to provide a picture of the local equality situation in Norway. Among the 12 indicators, the biggest change towards more gender equality is on the indicator that measures fathers' withdrawal of paternity quota and parental leave.

Read more at Statistics Norway

New report about young people's experiences of offering sex for money

21.11.2019

Young people’s experiences of prostitution are often gained well out of sight and usually outside the traditional arenas for prostitution. Nordic Information on Gender (NIKK) has published a new report  "Young people, vulnerabilities and prostitution/Sex for Compensation in the Nordic Countries".

Read more at nikk.no

“Europe wants more gender research”

20.11.2019

Gender equality generates better results within research and innovation. In addition, EU bureaucrats argue that European research funding should be earmarked with specific requirements for gender perspectives.

Read more at Kilden genderresearch.no

Looking to reap the benefits of internationalization

20.11.2019

In recent years some have asked whether the ceiling has been reached for the number of foreigners in Norwegian academia. The Young Academy of Norway would rather have a debate on how to best take advantage of this new diversity.

Read more at kifinfo.no

When Mum and Dad decide – negative social control

19.11.2019

Negative social control violates the freedom of children and young people to choose their friends, education and jobs. It needs to be prevented and stopped, according to the Nordic Council of Ministers’ Integration Conference. 

Read more at Norden.org

Report: Earmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms

14.11.2019

The Nordic Council of Ministers launches the report State of Nordic Fathers. The report finds that 90 percent of Nordic fathers want to be heavily involved in the care of their small children. But at the same time the fathers only take between a 10 and 30 percent share of parental leave. The report seeks an answer to this. 

Read more at Norden.org