Information and Resources on Gender Equality and Gender Research in Norway

Families & Relationships > Facts & Figures > Scientific Reports
What do we know about immigrants who do not work, study or receive benefits?
What do we know about immigrants who do not work, study or receive benefits?
In 2011, 16 per cent of immigrants aged 20-66 years had a weak attachment to the labour market. 59 per cent of them are women, but the share and the reasons why vary between different groups.
Origin date: 17.02.2016
Family immigration and marriage patterns
Family immigration and marriage patterns
Fewer Norwegian-born to immigrant parents marry at a young age, and those who marry often find a spouse in Norway, according to a new report.
Origin date: 03.2014
Children’s permanent residence and contact with non-resident parents 2002, 2004 and 2012: Changes in custody and care when parents live apart
Children’s permanent residence and contact with non-resident parents 2002, 2004 and 2012: Changes in custody and care when parents live apart
This report shows that among parents living apart, the proportion with shared residence for their child has increased from 8 per cent in 2002 to 25 per cent in 2012. The percentage residing with the mother decreased from 84 per cent in 2002 to 66 per cent in 2012.
Origin date: 01.2014
Does more involved fathering imply a double burden for fathers in Norway?
While long total work hours (paid plus unpaid work) have usually been framed as a problem for employed women, researchers now ask whether more involved fathering practices imply a double burden for men, too.
Origin date: 10.2013
Effects of paternity leave
A new report discusses the causal effects of paternity leave on children's and parents' outcomes.
Origin date: 07.2011
Tracing gender effects among Tanzanian rural households
Tanzania is in the process of preparing the next Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (MKUKUTA). The second phase of the poverty assessment focuses on constraints for households and individuals to make profitable investments, and differences in women's and men's opportunity structures.
Origin date: 2010
Gender and Migration. Similarities and disparities among women and men in the immigrant population
The report "Gender and Migration. Similarities and disparities among women and men in the immigrant population" gathers part of the data available on women and men with immigrant backgrounds in Norway collected by Statistics Norway.
Origin date: 2008
How is the time of women and men distributed in Europe?
Although patterns of time use are generally quite similar throughout Europe, some interesting differences can be observed between women and men and between the countries surveyed. On average, women aged 20 to 74 spend much more time than men on domestic work, ranging from less than 50% more in Sweden to over 200% more in Italy and Spain. Women spend most time doing domestic work in Italy, Estonia, Slovenia, Hungary and Spain, around 5 hours or more per day. The lowest figures are found in Sweden, Norway, Finland and Latvia - less than 4 hours per day.
Origin date: 2006